1937 Hermann Hauser Sr


Make: Hermann Hauser Sr
Model: Vienna Model Classical Guitar
Model Year: 1937
Top: German Spruce
Back & Sides: Maple
Scale: 630mm
Nut: 50mm
Finish: French Polish
Tuners: Landstorfer
Country: Germany
Condition: Used - Excellent
Location: Tucson

1937 Hermann Hauser Sr

1937hauser-ftx.jpg
1937hauser-rz.jpg
1937hauser-bk.jpg
1937hauser-ft.jpg
1937hauser-ftx.jpg
1937hauser-hd21.jpg
1937hauser-bk.jpg
1937hauser-ft.jpg
1937hauser-hd21.jpg
1937hauser-ftx.jpg
1937hauser-rz.jpg
1937hauser-bk.jpg
1937hauser-ft.jpg
1937hauser-ftx.jpg
1937hauser-hd21.jpg
1937hauser-bk.jpg
1937hauser-ft.jpg
1937hauser-hd21.jpg

1937 Hermann Hauser Sr

10,000.00

Make: Hermann Hauser Sr
Model: Vienna Model Classical Guitar
Model Year: 1937
Top: German Spruce
Back & Sides: Maple
Scale: 630mm
Nut: 50mm
Finish: French Polish
Tuners: Landstorfer
Country: Germany
Condition: Used - Excellent
Location: Tucson

Add To Cart

Jokingly one might call this Vienna model, the 1937 Hauser Segovia didn't choose. This guitar is fascinating not simply because it shows that Hauser continued to make Vienna style guitars even as he built Segovia's 1937 Spanish style concert guitar, but because its sound has decidedly Spanish character. When its construction is compared to the 1924 model in this collection it reveals also something of what he had learned from the Spanish tradition. While the bracing pattern remains essentially like that of the 1924 model, the treatment of the braces is very different. The 1924 model has very tall thin, hence very sturdy braces, making for a stiff top and back. The 1937's bracing are almost identical treatment to the braces in the 1934 Santos Hernandez is this collection, being half the height of the 1924's, making for a much more flexible top and back, and much different tone. Santos Hernandez, of course, is generally as the craftsman who worked for Manuel Ramirez that built Segovia 1912 guitar, a guitar that Segovia had let Hauser study. Hauser's Spanish guitars were also influenced by Miguel Llobet's Torres, which Hauser also had opportunity to study closely.

That Hauser continued to build his Vienna model even as he built Segovia's guitars is in itself interesting. Perhaps he felt with a few modifications, a German design could rival Spanish ones, or it may have simply been someone wanted one, and he obliged. Whatever his motivations the result was a German guitar with a decidedly Spanish flavor.